Navigating NVD API Changes: A Lifesaver Guide to Keeping Your CVE Scan Script Afloat

Crashed and Burned: When the NVD API 1.0 Retired, My Script Flatlined! Perry’s simple email led to a comedic caper of updates and unrequested spam—API key, are you just a digital autograph collector? Stay tuned for the script’s rebirth on GitHub. #NVDAPISaga

Hot Take:

Imagine you’ve crafted the perfect cybersecurity script, and then the digital rug gets pulled from under your feet because someone at the NVD decided to retire the API version you were using. But, fear not! Change is the only constant in the tech world, and our plucky programmer Rob has navigated the API evolution with the grace of a cat landing on its feet (and possibly with less swearing).

Key Points:

  • Old NVD API version 1.0 had been retired, leaving scripts across the globe in a state of existential crisis.
  • The new version 2.0 API requires an API key, potentially reducing surprise changes and unwanted spam (if your email filter doesn’t betray you).
  • Version 2.0 bundles all the data you could want in one call, making it like the Swiss Army knife of API calls.
  • Rob’s cvescan script will be getting a makeover to strut its stuff on the new API catwalk.
  • API changes can sneak up like ninjas; it’s always best to keep your digital shurikens ready (and check your email’s Junk folder).
Cve id: CVE-2013-3900
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 05/01/2022
Cve description: The WinVerifyTrust function in Microsoft Windows XP SP2 and SP3, Windows Server 2003 SP2, Windows Vista SP2, Windows Server 2008 SP2 and R2 SP1, Windows 7 SP1, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 Gold and R2, and Windows RT Gold and 8.1 does not properly validate PE file digests during Authenticode signature verification, which allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted PE file, aka "WinVerifyTrust Signature Validation Vulnerability."

Cve id: CVE-2016-0088
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 10/12/2018
Cve description: Hyper-V in Microsoft Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 Gold and R2, and Windows 10 allows guest OS users to execute arbitrary code on the host OS via a crafted application, aka "Hyper-V Remote Code Execution Vulnerability."

Cve id: CVE-2016-0089
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 10/12/2018
Cve description: Hyper-V in Microsoft Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 Gold and R2, and Windows 10 allows guest OS users to obtain sensitive information from host OS memory via a crafted application, aka "Hyper-V Information Disclosure Vulnerability."

Cve id: CVE-2016-0170
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 10/12/2018
Cve description: GDI in Microsoft Windows Vista SP2, Windows Server 2008 SP2 and R2 SP1, Windows 7 SP1, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 Gold and R2, Windows RT 8.1, and Windows 10 Gold and 1511 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted document, aka "Windows Graphics Component RCE Vulnerability."

Cve id: CVE-2015-6184
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 10/12/2018
Cve description: The CAttrArray object implementation in Microsoft Internet Explorer 7 through 11 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and memory corruption) via a malformed Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) token sequence in conjunction with modifications to HTML elements, aka "Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability," a different vulnerability than CVE-2015-6048 and CVE-2015-6049.

Need to know more?

When APIs Give You Lemons, Make Lemonade

Our cybersecurity samurai, Rob, faced the modern-day quandary of a beloved script hitting a brick wall when the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) decided to retire their API version 1.0. But like a phoenix rising from the ashes, Rob dove into the updated API docs faster than you can say "patch Tuesday."

The Key to the Future

In a twist that might have some donning their tinfoil hats, the new API requires a key for access. While this might sound like a ploy to harvest developer emails, it actually seems to be a cunning plan to keep us in the loop on future changes. And let's face it, getting a heads-up on API updates is like finding out the boss is bringing doughnuts to the next meeting.

All You Ever Wanted and More

The revamped API is like that one friend who always overpacks for trips. It's got everything you need in one call. It's so efficient, you might actually have time to sip that coffee while it's still hot. Just imagine, all the CVEs, their statuses, descriptions, and even CVSS scores neatly packed into one JSON response. It's like Christmas came early for cybersecurity geeks!

Scripting Through the API-pocalypse

Not one to be fazed by a little (read: colossal) API upheaval, Rob is already on a mission to update the cvescan script. It'll be decked out with the latest API finery, ready to dance at the ball that is GitHub, where all open-source princes and princesses can find it.

The Unpredictable Nature of APIs

Rob's tale is a cautionary one, reminding us that in the realm of programming, one must always be prepared for the ground to shift. APIs can change faster than fashion trends, leaving your code looking so last season. So, keep your eyes peeled, your scripts flexible, and maybe keep a sacrificial server on standby, just in case.

Remember to check in with Rob's GitHub for the latest in script couture, and if your own code has ever been left out in the cold by an API change, share your woes. Your non-disclosure agreement allowing, of course. Misery loves company, after all.

Tags: API Key Registration, CVE tracking, CVSS Metrics, NVD API, PowerShell Scripting, software vulnerability, Vulnerability References