Data Déjà Vu: France Reels from Record-Breaking Infosec Breach as 33 Million Citizens Compromised

Keyphrase: “massive security breach in France”

Sacre-bleu! Nearly half of France is reeling from a massive security breach, as 33 million baguettes—err, citizens—get their personal data pinched. Mon Dieu, where’s the cybersecurity garlic? 🥖🔒💔 #DataBreachDrama

Hot Take:

Oh là là, cybersecurity breaches are as fashionable in France as berets in a Parisian café. This time, though, it’s not about stolen croissants but rather the personal data of 33 million French citizens. Sacrebleu! As for the Canucks wanting to ban a geeky gadget because it might help someone pull a Gone in 60 Seconds? Good luck with that, eh? And let’s not forget our friend in Florida, who seems to be running a discount identity theft outlet from his prison cell. Multitasking at its finest, folks!

Key Points:

  • France just got a croissant-sized cyber-ouchie, with two healthcare payment servicers spilling the baguettes… I mean, the data of 33 million people.
  • Juniper plays hide and seek with customer info, but nobody’s winning that game.
  • Cisco’s vulnerabilities are giving IT departments more jitters than a double espresso.
  • Canada considers banning the Flipper Zero, because who needs hackers when you’ve got raccoons, right?
  • Florida man proves prison bars are no match for Wi-Fi signals, continuing his identity theft shenanigans.
Cve id: CVE-2023-4762
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: Chrome
Cve date updated: 09/05/2023
Cve description: Type Confusion in V8 in Google Chrome prior to 116.0.5845.179 allowed a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code via a crafted HTML page. (Chromium security severity: High)

Cve id: CVE-2024-20254
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: cisco
Cve date updated: 02/07/2024
Cve description: Multiple vulnerabilities in Cisco Expressway Series and Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server (VCS) could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to conduct cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attacks that perform arbitrary actions on an affected device. Note: "Cisco Expressway Series" refers to Cisco Expressway Control (Expressway-C) devices and Cisco Expressway Edge (Expressway-E) devices. For more information about these vulnerabilities, see the Details ["#details"] section of this advisory.

Cve id: CVE-2024-20252
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: cisco
Cve date updated: 02/07/2024
Cve description: Multiple vulnerabilities in Cisco Expressway Series and Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server (VCS) could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to conduct cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attacks that perform arbitrary actions on an affected device. Note: "Cisco Expressway Series" refers to Cisco Expressway Control (Expressway-C) devices and Cisco Expressway Edge (Expressway-E) devices. For more information about these vulnerabilities, see the Details ["#details"] section of this advisory.

Cve id: CVE-2023-22527
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: atlassian
Cve date updated: 01/16/2024
Cve description: A template injection vulnerability on older versions of Confluence Data Center and Server allows an unauthenticated attacker to achieve RCE on an affected instance. Customers using an affected version must take immediate action. Most recent supported versions of Confluence Data Center and Server are not affected by this vulnerability as it was ultimately mitigated during regular version updates. However, Atlassian recommends that customers take care to install the latest version to protect their instances from non-critical vulnerabilities outlined in Atlassian’s January Security Bulletin.

Cve id: CVE-2024-20255
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: cisco
Cve date updated: 02/07/2024
Cve description: A vulnerability in the SOAP API of Cisco Expressway Series and Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to conduct a cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attack on an affected system. This vulnerability is due to insufficient CSRF protections for the web-based management interface of an affected system. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by persuading a user of the REST API to follow a crafted link. A successful exploit could allow the attacker to cause the affected system to reload.

Need to know more?

Breach à la Française

Imagine a world where nearly half of France's population gets their data pinched. That's not the plot of a new heist movie; it's what happened when Viamedis and Almerys left their cyber windows open and the data breeze blew in some nasty thieves. The CNIL is now playing data detective, trying to figure out who dropped the cybersecurity croissant.

Juniper's Oopsie Daisy

Here's a twist—Juniper Networks’ support portal decided to overshare, like a tipsy uncle at Thanksgiving. A teenage intern, probably fueled by Red Bull and curiosity, stumbled upon this leaky faucet of device info. Moral of the story: if your intern can find it, so can the baddies. Juniper slapped some duct tape on the issue, but let's hope they also remember to tighten the proverbial screws.

Cisco's Vulnerability Fiesta

Cisco’s got more holes than a cheese grater, and they're serving up a buffet of cross-site request forgery vulnerabilities that could let attackers RSVP without an invite. They've issued patches faster than a pit crew at a race track, but the race against exploits is always a nail-biter.

Flipper Zero: Too Cool for School (or Canada)

Canada's looking to put the kibosh on the Flipper Zero, a gadget that's about as harmful as a Swiss Army knife in a pillow fight, at least when it comes to stealing cars. Sure, some cars' key fobs might be as easy to sniff out as maple syrup on pancakes, but most modern autos are rolling code fortresses. Maybe focus on the real problem, like how easy it is to start a Kia with a USB cable from the '90s.

Prison Break: Identity Theft Edition

Down in sunny Florida, Damien Dennis is the poster boy for multitasking. Already cozy in his state-issued accommodation for bank fraud, he decided to add a side hustle by pleading guilty to identity theft charges. The DoJ slapped him with an extra two years and a quarter-million-dollar fine. It’s like a BOGO sale, but for prison sentences.

Tags: Cybersecurity Vulnerabilities, dark web identity theft, data breach, device security, Network Security, Personal Data Exposure, vehicle theft prevention