Black Basta Blitz: Cybersecurity Experts Unveil Tactics to Thwart Ransomware Raiders

Facing the Black Basta Blitz: Cybersecurity experts unite to combat this ransomware scourge. With 500+ hits across critical sectors, they’re dropping knowledge bombs on TTPs and IOCs faster than you can say ‘StopRansomware’.

Hot Take:

Feeling nostalgic for the good old days when ransomware wasn’t a service? Too bad, Black Basta is here, and it’s serving up encryption specials across the globe. But don’t worry, our cybersecurity quartet: FBI, CISA, HHS, and MS-ISAC have banded together like the Avengers to drop some knowledge bombs on how to shield up against these cyber baddies. Remember folks, in the cyber realm, sharing is caring – so report those incidents, don’t pay the ransom, and let’s turn the tide on these digital pirates!

Key Points:

  • Black Basta ransomware has been naughty, targeting at least 12 critical infrastructure sectors, including healthcare – because who needs Hippocrates when you have hackers, right?
  • These baddies use a double-whammy approach: encrypting your data and then exfiltrating it just for kicks (and cash).
  • The ransom notes are like bad party invites – no details on the loot required, just a cryptic code and a ticking clock.
  • Our cybersecurity heroes recommend not paying the ransom – it’s like feeding a stray cat, do it once and they’ll never leave you alone.
  • Apparently, Black Basta enjoys a good tool swap meet, repurposing legitimate tools for their nefarious needs.
Title: Windows Print Spooler Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
Cve id: CVE-2021-34527
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 12/28/2023
Cve description: <p>A remote code execution vulnerability exists when the Windows Print Spooler service improperly performs privileged file operations. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could run arbitrary code with SYSTEM privileges. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights.</p> <p>UPDATE July 7, 2021: The security update for Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10, Version 1607 have been released. Please see the Security Updates table for the applicable update for your system. We recommend that you install these updates immediately. If you are unable to install these updates, see the FAQ and Workaround sections in this CVE for information on how to help protect your system from this vulnerability.</p> <p>In addition to installing the updates, in order to secure your system, you must confirm that the following registry settings are set to 0 (zero) or are not defined (<strong>Note</strong>: These registry keys do not exist by default, and therefore are already at the secure setting.), also that your Group Policy setting are correct (see FAQ):</p> <ul> <li>HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftWindows NTPrintersPointAndPrint</li> <li>NoWarningNoElevationOnInstall = 0 (DWORD) or not defined (default setting)</li> <li>UpdatePromptSettings = 0 (DWORD) or not defined (default setting)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Having NoWarningNoElevationOnInstall set to 1 makes your system vulnerable by design.</strong></p> <p>UPDATE July 6, 2021: Microsoft has completed the investigation and has released security updates to address this vulnerability. Please see the Security Updates table for the applicable update for your system. We recommend that you install these updates immediately. If you are unable to install these updates, see the FAQ and Workaround sections in this CVE for information on how to help protect your system from this vulnerability. See also <a href="https://support.microsoft.com/topic/31b91c02-05bc-4ada-a7ea-183b129578a7">KB5005010: Restricting installation of new printer drivers after applying the July 6, 2021 updates</a>.</p> <p>Note that the security updates released on and after July 6, 2021 contain protections for CVE-2021-1675 and the additional remote code execution exploit in the Windows Print Spooler service known as “PrintNightmare”, documented in CVE-2021-34527.</p>

Title: Active Directory Domain Services Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability
Cve id: CVE-2021-42278
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 01/18/2024
Cve description: Active Directory Domain Services Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability

Title: Active Directory Domain Services Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability
Cve id: CVE-2021-42287
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 01/18/2024
Cve description: Active Directory Domain Services Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability

Title: Netlogon Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability
Cve id: CVE-2020-1472
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: microsoft
Cve date updated: 01/18/2024
Cve description: An elevation of privilege vulnerability exists when an attacker establishes a vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connection to a domain controller, using the Netlogon Remote Protocol (MS-NRPC). An attacker who successfully exploited the vulnerability could run a specially crafted application on a device on the network. To exploit the vulnerability, an unauthenticated attacker would be required to use MS-NRPC to connect to a domain controller to obtain domain administrator access. Microsoft is addressing the vulnerability in a phased two-part rollout. These updates address the vulnerability by modifying how Netlogon handles the usage of Netlogon secure channels. For guidelines on how to manage the changes required for this vulnerability and more information on the phased rollout, see How to manage the changes in Netlogon secure channel connections associated with CVE-2020-1472 (updated September 28, 2020). When the second phase of Windows updates become available in Q1 2021, customers will be notified via a revision to this security vulnerability. If you wish to be notified when these updates are released, we recommend that you register for the security notifications mailer to be alerted of content changes to this advisory. See Microsoft Technical Security Notifications.

Title: Authentication bypass using an alternate path or channel
Cve id: CVE-2024-1709
Cve state: PUBLISHED
Cve assigner short name: cisa-cg
Cve date updated: 02/21/2024
Cve description: ConnectWise ScreenConnect 23.9.7 and prior are affected by an Authentication Bypass Using an Alternate Path or Channel vulnerability, which may allow an attacker direct access to confidential information or critical systems.

Need to know more?

Ransomware, but Make It Fashion:

First seen strutting its malicious code on the digital catwalk in April 2022, Black Basta is the "it" ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS) of the season. With over 500 organizations under its belt, it's like the Versace of viruses, impacting a broad range of industries including healthcare, which, let's face it, has had enough drama already.

Phishing for Compliments:

Black Basta affiliates must love the thrill of the hunt because they're out here phishing like it's a sport. And let's not forget their penchant for exploiting vulnerabilities – it's like finding the loose thread on a sweater and pulling until everything unravels.

The Tools of the Trade:

The Black Basta gang is nothing if not resourceful. They've turned BITSAdmin, Cobalt Strike, and Mimikatz into their own personal Swiss Army knives for cyber chaos, moving laterally across networks like a ballet dancer with a dark side.

The Mitigation Manifesto:

Our cyber defense squad has a plan. They're like the neighborhood watch but with less coffee and more actionable intelligence. They're pushing updates and multi-factor authentication like it's a Black Friday sale. And remember, train your people to spot a phish – it's like teaching them not to take candy from strangers.

Phishing-Resistant MFA: The Cybersecurity Holy Grail:

It seems the key to cybersecurity salvation is phishing-resistant multi-factor authentication (MFA). It's like installing a retina scanner on your digital life. And for the love of all that is secure, prioritize this for your VIP accounts – you wouldn't give the keys to your Ferrari to just anyone, right?

Testing, Testing, 1-2-3:

Last but not least, the authoring organizations recommend playing laser tag with your security program. Test, analyze, and tune those controls until they're tighter than Fort Knox. And keep doing it – consistency is key in the cybersecurity gym.

Reporting: Because Silence Isn't Always Golden:

Finally, don't go silent when hit by ransomware. Report it like a suspicious character lurking in the digital alleyways. The FBI, CISA, and HHS are all ears, ready to take your info and help kick these cybercriminals to the curb.

So there you have it. Stay vigilant, stay updated, and let's give Black Basta the boot. And remember, in the battle against ransomware, knowledge is power and reporting is your superpower.

Tags: Black Basta ransomware., critical infrastructure security, CVE-2024-1709, Healthcare Cybersecurity, MITRE ATT&CK framework, Phishing Tactics, RaaS Variant